Living In Ogden

Living In Ogden

Our History

Construction of the railroad, after pausing on the east side of the Des Moines River, continued its westward advance up out of the river valley and onto the prairie in the spring of 1866. It was a general rule that railroad surveyors would select a town site every 8-10 miles in order to be accessible to farmers and settlers who were yet to come. The town was mapped out and was named after the prominent railroad builder William Butler Ogden. The railroad depot was built in 1868.

  • In 1907, the first coal mine shaft was dug north of Ogden. It provided jobs for an estimated 300 people at one time. The coal industry closed down in 1953.
  • In 1912, the idea was conceived to build America’s first coast-to-coast automobile road. This road came to be known as the Lincoln Highway and passed through Ogden’s business district. The highway was paved in 1929.
  • In 1934, Ogden Compressor Plant (Northern Natural Gas) was built. The plant at one time employed over 300 people.

Today, Ogden still maintains a thriving small town retail district. Northern Natural Gas plant continues in operation, while nearby ethanol and seed processing plants have boosted the already strong farming community.